Mysterious “Skinner’s Cave” in Manchester, Vermont

As a follow up to my earlier post on Mount Equinox, I have found a mysterious reference to an “ice cave” (containing snow in mid-July) on Mount Equinox in Manchester, Vermont, in an old book, pictured below.  I have no idea where this might be, but it looks like it could be tracked down from the description in this 115 year old book, Glacieres; or Freezing Caves by Edwin Swift Balch, published in 1900 by Allen Lane & Scott of Philadelphia.

Take a look (and tell me in the comments if you have seen it!!!):

Skinner's Cave on Mount Equinox in Manchester, Vermont From “Glacieres; or Freezing Caverns” author Edwin Swift Balch published by Allen Lane & Scott in 1900
Author Edwin Swift Balch published by Allen Lane & Scott in 1900.
Skinner's Cave on Mount Equinox in Manchester, Vermont From “Glacieres; or Freezing Caverns” author Edwin Swift Balch published by Allen Lane & Scott in 1900.
Author Edwin Swift Balch published by Allen Lane & Scott in 1900.

I ran across another, even older, reference “Skinner Hollow is a deep amphitheatrical gulf on the south side of Equinox Mountain which has a cave so profound that snow remains there all year.” From New England: A Handbook for Travelers published in 1879 by The Riverside Press, Cambridge.

Are you familiar with Mount Equinox and have you hiked it?  Ever seen Skinner’s Cave?  Please do tell in the comments below.  Navigation tips to the cave appreciated.  For more information on Mount Equinox please see my earlier post.

12 thoughts on “Mysterious “Skinner’s Cave” in Manchester, Vermont

    1. It does sound interesting, I’ll have to figure out if it’s accessible from public hiking trails or not and then update. I think it’s a future summer hike, if the weather ever warms up enough to make snow welcome again. Thanks for reading!

      Liked by 2 people

      1. You’re welcome!

        Very possibly the ice affects the local climate around the cave and there may be some very rare species of animals there. In southeast Minnesota there are some places on the north sides of hills that are cold and some are the only sites for some very rare and tiny snails.

        Liked by 1 person

    1. Yes, the “purely a refrigerator” made me smile, and also the “…on learning the object of my visit, on the 5th of July, 1898, with true native American courtesy, walked up to it with me.”

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  1. Anonymous

    I have been to the cave, when I was a child, back in the 1970s. Manchester resident, Carleton Howe who was a family friend and I used to walk up there from his house. The description from the book matches what I remember seeing. Fascinating that it obviously hadn’t alterred!
    Did you ever get there?

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Anonymous

    This cave exists today, and is on my Family’s property. I live in the same residence as N.M. Canfield! We would appreciate anyone wishing to see the cave check with us first, as we prefer you be guided, especially if you wish to enter the cave. The cave is a natural bat hibernaculum, and must be carefully protected. The vimeo link was done by my Brother along with a group from the Vermont Caver’s Association. The link is an excellent way to see what the inside of the cave actually looks like!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks for the information! After viewing the video I think I much prefer to stay out of caves in general or prefer to simply see them via video. And yes, I would sincerely hope that anyone interested in seeing something on private land would check with the property owner. I hope you enjoyed reading the excerpt on the cave!

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