Mysterious “Skinner’s Cave” in Manchester, Vermont

As a follow up to my earlier post on Mount Equinox, I have found a mysterious reference to an “ice cave” (containing snow in mid-July) on Mount Equinox in Manchester, Vermont, in an old book, pictured below.  I have no idea where this might be, but it looks like it could be tracked down from the description in this 115 year old book, Glacieres; or Freezing Caves by Edwin Swift Balch, published in 1900 by Allen Lane & Scott of Philadelphia.

Take a look (and tell me in the comments if you have seen it!!!):

Skinner's Cave on Mount Equinox in Manchester, Vermont From “Glacieres; or Freezing Caverns” author Edwin Swift Balch published by Allen Lane & Scott in 1900
Author Edwin Swift Balch published by Allen Lane & Scott in 1900.
Skinner's Cave on Mount Equinox in Manchester, Vermont From “Glacieres; or Freezing Caverns” author Edwin Swift Balch published by Allen Lane & Scott in 1900.
Author Edwin Swift Balch published by Allen Lane & Scott in 1900.

I ran across another, even older, reference “Skinner Hollow is a deep amphitheatrical gulf on the south side of Equinox Mountain which has a cave so profound that snow remains there all year.” From New England: A Handbook for Travelers published in 1879 by The Riverside Press, Cambridge.

Are you familiar with Mount Equinox and have you hiked it?  Ever seen Skinner’s Cave?  Please do tell in the comments below.  Navigation tips to the cave appreciated.  For more information on Mount Equinox please see my earlier post.

Equinox Mountain: Vantage Point and Boundaries

Equinox Mountain overlooks the town of Manchester, Vermont.  It’s a mountain of hardwood forests, the mountain itself largely marble, and any buildings are few and far between. To get to the top, you have the choice of hiking up the side through the woods, or paying the Carthusian monks at the foot of the mountain for a token to drive up the five miles of hairpin turns of private road to the top. The road was created, and eleven square miles of this mountain was once owned, by Joseph George Davidson, who retired to Vermont after working as the head of Union Carbide’s “gaseous diffusion” project at Oak Ridge, in which uranium was refined and used in the fission of the atomic bombs of WWII.  I myself would not relocate from Continue reading “Equinox Mountain: Vantage Point and Boundaries”